Freedom is for Overcomers

 It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery.- Galatians 5:1

WholyFit on the rooftop!

15 September, 2010:  This week, we are celebrating Independence Day in Mexico. Actually, it is the celebration of the initiation of the War of Independence, which began in the wee hours of September 16, 1810 with the Grito de la Independencia – the cry of freedom.  The whole country dresses up in the colors of the flag: white, red and green.  The colors were chosen for their significance: Red – unity of the people, White – purity of the Catholic faith and Green – independence.  Later, president Benito Juarez (aka the Mexican Abraham Lincoln) changed the significance of the colors: White – unity, Green – hope, Red – the blood of the heroes who gave their lives for the country’s independence.   (more on Mexican History by Taco)

In the year 2010, Mexico celebrated the bicentennial celebration of the war of Independence, and the centennial celebration of the Revolutionary war. The festivities included special routes across the country, highlighting points of interest of the War of Independence and the Revolution – Rutas de la Independencia, and Rutas de la Revolucion, respectively. That year, Mom, my friend Esperanza and I and had ventured to the state of Guanajuato – following the ‘Ruta de la Independencia, where the Independence movement began.

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Taco’s Mexican History 101: Viva Mexico! The Cry for Independence

THE OTHER CONQUEST: COLONIAL MEXICO

Mural in stairwell of the Alhondiga, Guanajuato. The indigenous people – slaves – cry out to Dolores Hidalgo for help.

The Spaniards had conquered; a new era began: Nueva España. Mexico became a viceroyalty of Spain, its capital was built upon the ruins of Tenochtitlán and renamed ‘México Tenochtitlán’, renamed again in 1584 as ‘La Ciudad de México’ – Mexico City.  New laws were instated, such as one stating no cruelty to the indigenous people, but they were not very well enforced.  Some colonial officials such as Nuño de Guzmán became notorious for their cruelty.

The Spanish crown sent the Catholic church to the new land and convert the pagans; churches went up left and right, using indigenous people as workers (some would say slaves).  Along with it went the Spanish Inquisition and the auto de fé – public ceremonies of the Inquisition kind that included hangings and burnings of the heathen.  This went on from 1571 to 1850 – when the very last auto de fé took place.  That is not to say that all clergy were evil; there were a few, such as Vasco de Quiroga. who defended the indigenous people and truly did portray love.

The indigenous people may have been protected, but they had no rights in the eyes of the Crown.  Three centuries of this can leave a bad taste… Continue reading